New Study Suggests That Dental Visits Should Vary from Person to Person

We all know to visit the dentist twice a year for our cleanings, exams, and x-rays, but a new study suggests that dental visits should vary from person to person.   The research team, led by Dr. William Giannoble of the University Of Michigan School Of Dentistry, followed dental patients in Detroit for 16 years.

Almost half of all adults over 30 were said to have some sort of inflammatory gum disease, which could lead to tooth loss, or other damage. Some of the indicators of risk include smoking, diabetes, AIDS, genetics, and saliva reduction due to medications. The genes, named interleukin-1 (IL-I) have been linked with inflammatory disorders, bone infections, eye disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and gum disease.

In the group of nearly 5,000 patients which were studied, the people with high risk conditions still faced tooth loss despite their twice a year preventative cleaning, which is the recommended care regimen across the board. While the healthier mouths were reportedly just fine with the semi-annual cleaning, researchers are calling for a less one-size-fits-all approach to cleanings.

Some criticism of the study involves the failure to mention the oral, hygiene of the patients which were involved. Tooth loss is profoundly impacted by how much a person brushes, and how they take care of their teeth, not just their dental visits. While much of modern dentistry focuses on treatment, the team at the University of Michigan claim that prevention is an important part of oral health, and should not be overlooked.

The American Dental Association is now recommending that people receive custom-tailored treatment based on their risk factors, current health, and medical history. Some of the signs to look for if you are not sure whether to see a dentist sooner than later are swollen, tender gums which bleed easily, gums which have pulled away from teeth, chronic bad breath, or teeth movement.

Meta- New Study Suggests That Dental Visits Should Vary from Person to Person.  The research team, led by Dr. William Giannoble of the University Of Michigan