Gingivitis might be linked to Alzheimer’s

Avoiding gingivitis might have a larger incentive than avoiding periodontitis and tooth decay. A new study released by the College of Dentistry at University of Central Lancashire and The Blizard Institute in the United Kingdom has indicated that dental bacteria may lead to brain degeneration and Alzheimer’s.

The two research teams discovered that oral bacteria was present in four out of 10 Alzheimer’s disease brain samples, while none were found in the brains of individuals without Alzheimer’s disease. The project has been underway for the three years and has concluded that the human mouth contains more than 700 different types of bacteria.

Lead researcher Dr. Lakshmyya Kesavula stated that to prevent bacteria from entering the blood and the brain you should cut down on sugary foods and smoking. There are three known types of Alzheimer’s disease; early-onset, late-onset and familial Alzheimer’s disease, which is determined by genetics.

Bacteria have been shown to effect individuals with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, said Kesavalu.

The best ways to prevent gingivitis and bacteria in the mouth is to be consistent and diligent with your home care. This means flossing and brushing every day and making regular trips to see your dentist. Additionally, brush up on your family history both of Alzheimer’s and periodontitis. Some patients can keep the utmost care of their teeth but still are unable to avoid bacteria because of genetic history.

Consider purchasing a Rotadent toothbrush if your dentist has already indicated that you are developing gingivitis or periodontitis. The Rotadent is a revolutionary new toothbrush that gets in between the teeth using a 360 degree motion.

There is also a very effective tooth and gum tonic that is a strong alternative to traditional mouthwash like Listerine.

While the research linking Alzheimer’s to gingivitis is still inconclusive, proper brushing and tooth care is always a necessity.