Choosing a Pediatric Dentist

Choosing the right pediatric dentist is a big decision for your family. If you pick the right dentist their services can be used for an entire generation of your family. Here are some things to think about when choosing a pediatric dentist:

Finding a Kid’s Dentist

  • Ask for recommendations from your friends and family. Everybody needs a good dentist!
  • Ask for a referral from your current pediatrician.
  • Use services like Google, Yellow Pages, and Angie’s List.
  • Ask about training and credentials. A pediatric dentist requires two years of additional years of residency training for babies, kids, teens and children with special needs.

What care is provided to your child?

If you find a dentist that is right for your family, your child will see their pediatric from infancy through adolescence. Here’s a list of care that you should expect:

  • Oral examinations and risk assessment for cavities in infants. Children are far more susceptible to tooth decay and cavities.
  • Knowledge of dental habits and recognizing poor routines such as thumb sucking, teeth grinding and pacifier use.
  • Repair of cavities and other tooth defects.
  • Assessment of normal tooth development.
  • Determination of whether orthodontic care is necessary.
  • Manage and prevent gum diseases, including gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Oral Health Education

Oral health extends outside of the dental office and requires diligent home care and education. Your pediatric dentist can help educate you and your little ones on:

  • The risks of a sugary diet on oral and overall health.
  • Education on proper care of infant or baby teeth.
  • Demonstration of how to properly care for infants teeth.
  • Demonstration of how to properly brush and floss teeth.

Atmosphere

A safe, fun and friendly atmosphere at your dentist’s office will make your children look forward to sitting in the dentist’s chair! Look for these indicators of a great pediatric dentist:

  • Kid friendly dental office!
  • Are the tools appropriate for a child’s mouth?
  • Is the office staff friendly and personable?
  • Does the dentist sit down with the child to explain what to expect.
  • Does your dentist know who to deal with a crying or scared child?